Random Stream
RSS
Welcome to the Board!
So why kelology? it is basically the study of the author's thoughts himself!

Note: enter with a mood, leave with a smile =)

Hello there sTumblr welcome to kelology, where you can find random sh*t.

Please check out the other sites of the author below.
Things I Like (+)
rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Spinular Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
Known from only a single area in Kerala state, the spinular night frog is also among the largest of its genus, reaching up to 2.6 in (6.6 cm). Its scientific name, Nyctibatrachus acanthodermis, derives from two Greek words—acanthos, meaning “spine” or “thorn,” and dermis, meaning “skin”—a reference to the spiny skin on the frog’s back.
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Spinular Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

Known from only a single area in Kerala state, the spinular night frog is also among the largest of its genus, reaching up to 2.6 in (6.6 cm). Its scientific name, Nyctibatrachus acanthodermis, derives from two Greek words—acanthos, meaning “spine” or “thorn,” and dermis, meaning “skin”—a reference to the spiny skin on the frog’s back.

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Coorg Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
Rediscovered after 90 years, the Coorg night frog was originally described in 1920 by CR Narayana Rao, “the pioneer of Indian amphibian research,” researcher Biju Das said. The species was discovered in Coorg—now Kodagu—an area in India’s Karnataka state. Das and colleagues found just one male frog in Mercara, a town near Kodagu.
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Coorg Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

Rediscovered after 90 years, the Coorg night frog was originally described in 1920 by CR Narayana Rao, “the pioneer of Indian amphibian research,” researcher Biju Das said. The species was discovered in Coorg—now Kodagu—an area in India’s Karnataka state. Das and colleagues found just one male frog in Mercara, a town near Kodagu.

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Gavi Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
Researcher Biju Das and colleagues found the loud-singing Gavi night frog in a cardamom plantation in India’s Kerala state. It’s named after Gavi, a village in the middle of the plantation. Several of the 12 newly discovered species are very rare, existing only in small pockets of protected forests, Das noted. Others, like the Gavi night frog, live outside reserves and need conservation attention, he said. 
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Gavi Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

Researcher Biju Das and colleagues found the loud-singing Gavi night frog in a cardamom plantation in India’s Kerala state. It’s named after Gavi, a village in the middle of the plantation. Several of the 12 newly discovered species are very rare, existing only in small pockets of protected forests, Das noted. Others, like the Gavi night frog, live outside reserves and need conservation attention, he said. 

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Wayanad Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
With males measuring up to 3 inches (7.7 centimeters), the robust-bodied Wayanad night frog is the now biggest of the Nyctibatrachus genus. Unlike their brethren, which abandon their eggs when threatened, Wayanad frogs will stay and fight aggressors. For example, “when the [egg] site was approached too closely by the investigator, the guarding animals … instantly inflated or raised the body, and did not hesitate to bite a twig or a finger,” according to the study.
 (via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Wayanad Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

With males measuring up to 3 inches (7.7 centimeters), the robust-bodied Wayanad night frog is the now biggest of the Nyctibatrachus genus. Unlike their brethren, which abandon their eggs when threatened, Wayanad frogs will stay and fight aggressors. For example, “when the [egg] site was approached too closely by the investigator, the guarding animals … instantly inflated or raised the body, and did not hesitate to bite a twig or a finger,” according to the study.

 (via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Jog’s Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
The newfound species Jog’s night frog has an “extremely unique” parenting style, at least for frogs: Both mom and dad watch over their eggs until they hatch. Named for their habitat of Jog Falls, the frogs live along fast-flowing streams. When courting a female, the male will sit on a leaf or a branch above the stream and make an “advertisement call,” Das said.
When a female approaches, he’ll grasp her with his front legs for about 20 minutes. When he dismounts, the female lays eggs, which the male promptly fertilizes and then covers with his body. Researcher  Biju Das has observed co-parenting in just six night-frog species, though he suspects it exists across the Nyctibatrachus genus.
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Jog’s Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

The newfound species Jog’s night frog has an “extremely unique” parenting style, at least for frogs: Both mom and dad watch over their eggs until they hatch. Named for their habitat of Jog Falls, the frogs live along fast-flowing streams. When courting a female, the male will sit on a leaf or a branch above the stream and make an “advertisement call,” Das said.

When a female approaches, he’ll grasp her with his front legs for about 20 minutes. When he dismounts, the female lays eggs, which the male promptly fertilizes and then covers with his body. Researcher  Biju Das has observed co-parenting in just six night-frog species, though he suspects it exists across the Nyctibatrachus genus.

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

 
Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Meowing Night Frog
by Christine Dell’Amore
 
A unique “catcall” inspired the name of the meowing night frog (pictured), one of 12 new species of frogs found recently in western India, a new study says. The 1.4-inch (3.5-centimeter) frog Nyctibatrachus poocha—”poocha” meaning “domestic cat” in the local Indian language—has a “secretive lifestyle,” hiding out inside rock crevices in the states of Western Ghats-Kerala and Tamil Nadu, said Biju Das, a biologist at the University of Delhi.
Between 1994 and 2010, Das and colleagues scoured forests along Indian’s western coast for nocturnal, stream-dwelling frogs in the poorly studied genusNyctibatrachus. In addition to revealing the 12 new species, the team rediscovered 3 species thought extinct, according to the study, published September 15 in the journalZootaxa.
(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered Frogs, India:  Meowing Night Frog

by Christine Dell’Amore

A unique “catcall” inspired the name of the meowing night frog (pictured), one of 12 new species of frogs found recently in western India, a new study says. The 1.4-inch (3.5-centimeter) frog Nyctibatrachus poocha—”poocha” meaning “domestic cat” in the local Indian language—has a “secretive lifestyle,” hiding out inside rock crevices in the states of Western Ghats-Kerala and Tamil Nadu, said Biju Das, a biologist at the University of Delhi.

Between 1994 and 2010, Das and colleagues scoured forests along Indian’s western coast for nocturnal, stream-dwelling frogs in the poorly studied genusNyctibatrachus. In addition to revealing the 12 new species, the team rediscovered 3 species thought extinct, according to the study, published September 15 in the journalZootaxa.

(via: National Geo)   (photo: Biju Das)

animalworld:

CHINESE WATER DRAGONPhysignathus cocincinusZeus by Nightcry
Chinese Water Dragons are also known as Asian Water Dragons, Thai Water Dragons, and Green Water Dragons.Chinese water dragons can grow up to 90 cm (3 ft) in length for males and up to 60 cm (2 ft) for females but 2/3 of this is tail length.
Native to the lowland and highland forests of India, Northern and southern China, and eastern and southeastern Asia. Chinese water dragons are  most commonly found along the banks of freshwater lakes and streams.  They are active during the day (diurnal), and spend most of their time  in the trees or plants (arboreal). If threatened, the dragon will drop into the water and either swim to safety or remain  submerged for up to 25 minutes. Water dragons live in areas with average  humidity levels of 40–80% and temperatures ranging from 80–90 °F.
For Anon who asked about discerning male and female:
All water dragons begin looking like femalesFor a male watch for the following:
His head will begin to get larger and wider and even more 				  triangular.
The crest on the neck will begin to get higher, and the spikes 				  much longer
The spikes on his back will get longer,  				    
      You’ll notice that below the 						spikes there is a ridge of bone or cartilage under the skin that points upward, 						just as the spikes do. On an adult male these bony 						protrusions are approximately 1/2 inch long 						(1.2 cm). 

 the spikes at the base of the tail will get substantially 				  higher, almost like a secondary dorsal crest
the femoral pores on the underside of the back legs will grow 				  much wider, become darker and start to fill with a waxy like substance. 
As the male dragon approaches adulthood you should notice that 				  his body is also more triangular shaped … upward triangular, and that the 				  base of the tail is much more triangular than that of a female whose body is more rounded or pear shaped 						(especially in the abdominal area), and her tail should remain rounded in 						appearance.
If your dragon gets to be say, 5 				inches snout to vent or longer, and it’s total length is 18 or more inches and 				you haven’t started to see some of these changes in appearance you most likely 				have a female dragon.
Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_water_dragonFor more info on sexing your animal: http://www.triciaswaterdragon.com/sex.htm
Other posts:
Chinese Water Dragon
Mountain Horned Dragons
Blue Headed Rock Agama

animalworld:

CHINESE WATER DRAGON
Physignathus cocincinus
Zeus by Nightcry

Chinese Water Dragons are also known as Asian Water Dragons, Thai Water Dragons, and Green Water Dragons.Chinese water dragons can grow up to 90 cm (3 ft) in length for males and up to 60 cm (2 ft) for females but 2/3 of this is tail length.

Native to the lowland and highland forests of India, Northern and southern China, and eastern and southeastern Asia. Chinese water dragons are most commonly found along the banks of freshwater lakes and streams. They are active during the day (diurnal), and spend most of their time in the trees or plants (arboreal). If threatened, the dragon will drop into the water and either swim to safety or remain submerged for up to 25 minutes. Water dragons live in areas with average humidity levels of 40–80% and temperatures ranging from 80–90 °F.

For Anon who asked about discerning male and female:

All water dragons begin looking like females
For a male watch for the following:

  • His head will begin to get larger and wider and even more triangular.
  • The crest on the neck will begin to get higher, and the spikes much longer
  • The spikes on his back will get longer,
    •       You’ll notice that below the spikes there is a ridge of bone or cartilage under the skin that points upward, just as the spikes do. On an adult male these bony protrusions are approximately 1/2 inch long (1.2 cm).
  • the spikes at the base of the tail will get substantially higher, almost like a secondary dorsal crest
  • the femoral pores on the underside of the back legs will grow much wider, become darker and start to fill with a waxy like substance.
  • As the male dragon approaches adulthood you should notice that his body is also more triangular shaped … upward triangular, and that the base of the tail is much more triangular than that of a female whose body is more rounded or pear shaped (especially in the abdominal area), and her tail should remain rounded in appearance.

If your dragon gets to be say, 5 inches snout to vent or longer, and it’s total length is 18 or more inches and you haven’t started to see some of these changes in appearance you most likely have a female dragon.

Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_water_dragon
For more info on sexing your animal: http://www.triciaswaterdragon.com/sex.htm

Other posts:

Chinese Water Dragon

Mountain Horned Dragons

Blue Headed Rock Agama

rhamphotheca:

the rather earthworm-like caecilian, Gegeneophis mhadeiensis

It’s not a worm its a caecilian or an amphibian for commonality. Related to salamanders and anurans.

rhamphotheca:

the rather earthworm-like caecilian, Gegeneophis mhadeiensis

It’s not a worm its a caecilian or an amphibian for commonality. Related to salamanders and anurans.

rhamphotheca:

reptilesandexotics: juvenile Green Cat-eyed Snake (Boiga cyanea)
* A nocturnal rear-fanged venomous snake (in the family Colubridae) found in South and Southeast Asia. This species undergoes an ontogenetic color shift. It starts out with a brilliant red body, green head and yellow belly and jaw; and turns mostly green as an adult. 
This might be one of my favorite snakes!

rhamphotheca:

reptilesandexotics: juvenile Green Cat-eyed Snake (Boiga cyanea)

* A nocturnal rear-fanged venomous snake (in the family Colubridae) found in South and Southeast Asia. This species undergoes an ontogenetic color shift. It starts out with a brilliant red body, green head and yellow belly and jaw; and turns mostly green as an adult. 

This might be one of my favorite snakes!

(Source: )

rhamphotheca:

Skeleton of the Gharial (Gavialis gangeticus)
The Gharial or Gavial is a critically endangered crocodilian, found in South Asia, with a long slender snout that specializes in feeding on fish as an adult.
(photo: Sklmsta, skeleton articulated by Skulls Unlimited)

rhamphotheca:

Skeleton of the Gharial (Gavialis gangeticus)

The Gharial or Gavial is a critically endangered crocodilian, found in South Asia, with a long slender snout that specializes in feeding on fish as an adult.

(photo: Sklmsta, skeleton articulated by Skulls Unlimited)